Hawaii Crop Weather Weekly Report

Here is the PDF file for the Hawaii Crop Weather (crop progress and condition) Report for the week ending October 28, 2007.

current_hi102808.pdf

Please visit the website for more information: http://www.nass.usda.gov/hi/

USDA NASS Hawaii Field Office
1421 South King Street
Honolulu, HI 96814-2512
1-800- 804-9514

Agricultural Highlights

Fruits

Bananas
Steady rain later in the week saturated most fields in windward areas of the Big Island. Most orchards were in good condition, and field work was only slightly hampered by the wet conditions. Banana Bunchy Top virus incidence remained isolated to the Puna and Kona areas. Oahu orchards were in good to fair condition. Leeward and central orchards were in good condition. Moderate to heavy irrigation levels prevailed as showers were not enough for irrigation. However, overcast conditions decreased the plant?s water needs. Windward Oahu fields were in fair to good condition with light supplies. Overall harvesting on Oahu was expected to be at moderate to heavy levels as the shorter day length and slightly cooler temperatures have slowed ripening. Kauai?s orchards were in fair to good condition. Overcast skies and cooler temperatures slowed fruit ripening slightly.

Papayas
On Oahu, fruit development and ripening were fair to good. Overcast skies and shorter day length were affecting the crop. Orchards on Kauai made fair to good progress during the week. Pickings continued at moderate to light levels from several fields in active harvest. Big Island orchards were in fair to good condition. Soil moisture was high due to almost daily rainfall in the Puna area. Young orchards continued to develop, and seedlings were growing rapidly. Flowering was continuous. Virus problems still plagued selected fields in Puna and some heavily infested areas appeared to be abandoned.

Vegetables

Chinese Cabbage
On the Big Island, weeds were still competing with the crop in selected fields. Planting and field activities were steady. Heavy irrigation was needed to maintain crop progress. Overall, the Big Island crop was in fair to good condition.

Head Cabbage
On Oahu, harvesting is anticipated to be light. Insect infestation was light with regular spraying keeping good controls. On the Big Island, weed growth was still competing with the crop in selected fields. Planting and field activities were steady. Heavy irrigation was needed to maintain crop progress. Overall, the Big Island crop was in fair to good condition.

Sweet Corn
Windward and central Oahu fields continued to make good progress under fair weather conditions and heavy irrigation. Production is forecast to be at moderate to heavy levels for the upcoming week. Corn plantings in windward areas of the Big Island received a boost in growth when relatively dry conditions were relieved by this week?s rain. The added soil moisture and mostly sunny days boosted growth of young seedlings. Harvesting was mostly for on-island sales.

Cucumbers
On Oahu, pressure from insect infestation was at light to moderate. Harvesting was active in several fields, and overall production levels are expected to be moderate to heavy.

Disaster Preparedness

Disaster Preparedness
How Prepared is Your Farming Operation?

Maui Extension Office
Monday, November 26, 2007
11 am ? 1:30 pm

Natural disasters, such as droughts, floods, wild fires, hurricanes, pests, and diseases, can cause excessive economic damage to agricultural production. In addition to crop damage, disasters can also affect farm buildings, machinery, animals, irrigation, family members and employees. Disasters along with marketing difficulties can lead to serious downturns in your farm income.

How prepared are you? This workshop is designed to provide you with information on:
1) preparing your operation for a natural disaster and
2) available and affordable crop insurance programs that minimize risk associated with economic losses.
Note: Now that the “Adjusted Gross Revenue” (AGR) insurance is available for 2008, in effect all Hawaii crops can be insured to some degree ? not just bananas, coffee, papayas, macnuts & nursery.

Speakers:
? USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) administers and oversees farm commodity, credit, conservation, disaster and loan programs. These programs are designed to improve the economic stability of the agricultural industry and to help farmers adjust production to meet demand.

? USDA Risk Management Agency Western Regional Office, Davis. USDA RMA helps producers manage their business risks through effective, market-based risk management solutions.

? John Nelson from the Western Center for Risk Management Education (Washington State University) on the new Adjusted Gross Revenue (AGR) Insurance.

? Dr. Mike Fanning, Executive Vice President, AgriLogic, is a specialist in Agri-Terroism, crop insurance, farm policy analysis, and individual farm risk management.

? Dr. Kent Fleming, an agricultural economist with the University of Hawaii’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR), is an Extension Farm Management Specialist with a focus on risk management education.

The workshop is FREE and lunch (sandwiches or bentos and drinks) will be provided. For more information, visit the website http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/agrisk/ You may also contact Kent Fleming @ 989-3416 or fleming@hawaii.edu or Jan McEwen @ 244-3242 or jmcewen@hawaii.edu

Please call the Maui Extension Office at 244-3242 by November 21, 2007 to register for this seminar.

Hawaii Crop Weather Weekly Report

Here is the PDF file for the Hawaii Crop Weather (crop progress and condition) Report for the week ending October 21, 2007.

previous_hi102107.pdf

Please visit the website for more information: http://www.nass.usda.gov/hi/

USDA NASS Hawaii Field Office
1421 South King Street
Honolulu, HI 96814-2512
1-800- 804-9514

Agricultural Highlights

Fruits

Bananas
On the Big Island, warm temperatures kept harvesting fairly steady, but slightly cooler temperatures and shorter days should soon slow production. Banana Bunchy Top virus incidence remained isolated in the Puna and Kona areas. Oahu orchards were in good to fair condition. Leeward and central fields were in good condition with moderate to heavy supplies for the market. Heavy irrigation continued as most areas received little or no rain during the week. Windward Oahu fields were in fair to good condition with light supplies. Overall harvesting on Oahu is expected to be at moderate to heavy levels as the shorter day length and slightly cooler temperatures have slowed ripening. Kauai?s orchards were in fair to good condition. Passing showers provided favorable soil moisture for most orchards. Spraying for insect infestation was on a regular schedule.

Papayas
Big Island orchards were in fair to good condition. Soil moisture was maintained by light passing showers and some cloud cover during the week. Steady flowering was noticed. Recent spray activity has reduced weed growth in some orchards. Young orchards were progressing rapidly. Overall harvesting was at a moderate level on Oahu. Some orchards were being re-worked for future harvest after being damaged by a wildfire. In other areas, fruit development and ripening were fair to good with relief from the high temperatures favoring crop progress. Orchards on Kauai continued to make fair to good progress during the week. Pickings continued at moderate to light levels from several fields in active harvest.

Vegetables

Head Cabbage
Some Big Island fields showed rapid weed growth competing with the crop, but overall crop conditions were fair to good. Planting has been steady during the week Heavy irrigation was needed to maintain progress. Maui?s crop continued to make steady progress and was in good condition. Quality was reportedly good. Insect pressure remained relatively low and damage by insects was under control with timely spraying. Growth and development slowed, but production was being adjusted to stabilize a consistent supply into the marketplace. On Oahu, harvesting will be light. Insect infestation was light with regular spraying keeping populations under control.

Sweet corn
Harvesting from Oahu fields is expected to be at moderate to heavy levels as several fields were in active harvest. Pressure from insect infestation was at light to moderate levels.

Other Crops

Coffee
The coffee crop in the Ka`u District of the Big Island was progressing well, and harvesting was active in most orchards. Regular moisture over the slopes benefited bean development. Outlook for the crop was generally good. There have been reports of a later than normal season. Kauai?s orchards were in good condition due to favorable weather during the week. Mostly sunny days prevailed with beneficial rains which kept the reservoirs supplied for irrigation. Overall soil moisture was good and helped to ensure normal crop development. Coffee harvesting has also started on Molokai where fields have been rejuvenated.

Jack-O-Lantern Pumpkins
Active harvesting of pumpkins and gourds continued on Oahu as Halloween nears. Sunny and dry conditions allowed the crop to make good progress with good fruit set and sizing.

Sugarcane
On Kauai, harvesting has ended for the season. Planting activities are expected to continue for several more weeks. Favorable weather conditions, including rain at the upper elevations, kept reservoir levels and ditches supplied which allowed for adequate irrigation for good crop progress. Steady harvesting continued on Maui. Generally dry weather in the Central areas aided harvesting activities.

Hawaii Crop Weather Weekly Report

Here is the PDF file for the Hawaii Crop Weather (crop progress and condition) Report for the week ending October 14, 2007.

current_hi101407.pdf

Please visit the website for more information: http://www.nass.usda.gov/hi/

USDA NASS Hawaii Field Office
1421 South King Street
Honolulu, HI 96814-2512
1-800- 804-9514

Agricultural Highlights

Fruits

Bananas
Big Island orchards were in generally good condition. Soil moisture was adequate. Field activities such as spraying for disease control, leaf trimming, and harvesting were on-going in Pepeekeo and Keaau. Leeward and central fields on Oahu were in good condition with moderate to heavy supplies for the market. Heavy irrigation continued as those fields remained dry. Windward fields were in fair to good condition with light supplies. Overall harvesting on Oahu was expected to be at moderate to heavy levels as the shorter day length and slightly cooler temperatures have slowed ripening. Kauai?s orchards were in fair to good condition. Passing showers provided some valuable soil moisture for most orchards. Spraying for insect infestation was on a regular schedule.

Papayas
Big Island orchards in the lower Puna area were in good to fair condition. Good soil moisture and sunny periods benefited most of the young and new orchards. Young trees in the Pohoiki area were in the seedling to first flower stage of development. Mature trees in adjacent fields had medium to full fruit columns. Mature trees in the lower Opihikao area were in generally good condition with full fruit columns. Isolated orchards in the area had young trees with heavy insect infestation. Spraying for insect control was required. Spraying for weed control was also required in some fields. On Oahu, overall harvesting was at moderate levels with some orchards being reworked for future harvest after being damaged by a wildfire. In other areas of the island, fruit development and ripening were fair to good with cooler temperatures favoring crop progress. Orchards on Kauai continued to make fair to good progress during the week. Pickings continued at moderate to light levels from several fields in active harvest.

Vegetables

Head Cabbage
The Big Island?s Waimea crop was in fair to good condition. Heavy irrigation maintained normal crop progress. Maui?s crop continued to benefit from the cooling growing conditions, even though there has been some noticeable decrease in growth and development for most fields. Insect pressure was moderate to low. Steady planting and harvesting was observed. Overall, the crop was in mostly good condition. On Oahu, insect infestations were light and being controlled by regular spraying. Harvesting will be light.

Sweet corn
Big Hawaii fields made good progress due to sunny weather and beneficial showers providing adequate moisture. Supplies will be for local sales. Windward and central Oahu fields continued to make good progress with the sunny and dry weather during the week along with heavy irrigation. Areas affected by water use restrictions have cut back on planting activities and have experienced decreased yields. Overall supplies will be moderate to heavy.

Dry onion
Maui?s crop made steady progress. Growth and development were good with less heat stress than the previous months. Insect pressure was still present in most fields, but the crop was not adversely affected and rated in fair condition. Planting activity slowed slightly.

Other Crops

Coffee
Kauai?s fields were in good condition due to favorable weather during the week. Mostly sunny days prevailed with beneficial rains keeping the reservoirs supplied for irrigation and providing soil moisture good that ensured normal crop development. Occasional breezy trade winds and rains caused light fruit drop, however, harvesting continued very active with about a month left to the season.

Sugarcane
Sugarcane fields on Kauai were in very good condition for the last week of this season?s harvest. Planting was expected to continue until the end of the year. Favorable weather conditions including rains at the upper elevations kept reservoir levels and ditches supplied which ensured adequate irrigation for good crop progress.

Hawaii Seed Crops

Here is the PDF file for the Hawaii Seed Crops report.

seed.pdf

Please visit the website for more information: http://www.nass.usda.gov/hi/

————————————————————-
Contact Information:
Mark E. Hudson, Director
USDA NASS Hawaii Field Office
1421 South King Street
Honolulu, HI 96814-2512

Office: (808) 973-9588 / (800) 804-9514
Fax: (808) 973-2909
————————————————————-

The Hawaii Field Office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service estimates the value of Hawaii=s seed industry at a record high $97.6 million for the 2006/07 season. This preliminary estimate represents a 26-percent increase from 2005/06?s revised estimate of $77.3 million. Seed corn is expected to account for $94.0 million, or 96 percent, of the total value in 2006/07. A variety of other seed crops will account for the remaining 4 percent. Outshipments of seed are anticipated to total a record high 9.0 million pounds during the 2006/07 season, up 19 percent from the 7.6 million pounds shipped during the 2005/06 season. Acreage harvested for all seed crops is expected to total a record high 4,820 acres during the 2006/07 season, up 16 percent from the 2005/06 season.

Hawaii Monthly Livestock Review

Here is the PDF file for the *Hawaii Monthly Livestock Review *Report.

lvstk100207.pdf

Please visit the website for more information: http://www.nass.usda.gov/hi/

————————————————————-
Contact Information:
Mark E. Hudson, Director
USDA NASS Hawaii Field Office
1421 South King Street
Honolulu, HI 96814-2512

Office: (808) 973-9588 / (800) 804-9514
Fax: (808) 973-2909
————————————————————-

HAWAII MONTHLY LIVESTOCK REVIEW” reports are available on our website and also PRINTED monthly. Subscriptions for PRINTED copies are free to those persons who report agricultural data to NASS (upon request) and available for $4 per year to all others.

Hawaii Monthly Livestock Review

August Egg Production Down 17 Percent From A Year Ago
Hawaii egg production totaled 6.8 million (18,889 cases) in August 2007, down 17 percent from August 2006. The average number of layers on hand during August 2007 was estimated at 368,000, down fractionally from July 2007 and down 14 percent from August 2006. The average rate of lay during August 2007 was 1,848 per 100 layers (59.6 percent rate of lay), down 3 percent from August 2006.

August Cattle Marketings Up 12 Percent From 2006
Total cattle marketings for August 2007 is estimated at 3,800 head, up 12 percent from August 2006. Cumulative cattle marketings for the first eight months of 2007 totaled 35,500 head, down 2 percent from the same period a year ago.

August exports up 13 percent from a year ago
Exports of steers and heifers totaled 2,700 head in August 2007, up 13 percent from a year ago. Exports of steers totaled 1,100 head during August 2007, down 31 percent compared to a year ago. Total export of heifers increased in August 2007 to 1,600 head, double the amount of heifers exported a year ago. Cumulative exports of steers and heifers through August 2007 totaled 28,100 head, down 3 percent from the same period a year ago. Cumulative exports of steers for 2007 stands at 15,800 head, down 8 percent from 2006. Exports of heifers were 2 percent ahead of a year ago for the first seven months of 2007 at 12,200 head. Exports of other classes of cattle were not included.

Average live weight tops 430 pounds
The average live weight of steers and heifers exported from Hawaii in August 2007 was 433 pounds, up 4 percent from August 2006?s average live weight of 418 pounds.

Commercial Beef Production Down Fractionally From Year Ago
Hawaii commercial beef production (local slaughter) during August 2007 totaled 609,000 pounds, down fractionally from August 2006. Cumulative beef production (local slaughter) through August 2007 totaled 4.3 million pounds, up 4 percent from a year ago. Commercial kill totaled 1,100 head in August, up 10 percent from August 2006. Average live weight per head was 1,045 pounds in August 2007, down 6 percent from the average live weight per head in August 2006.

Commercial Pork Production Down 11 Percent
Hawaii commercial pork production during August 2007 totaled 298,000 pounds, down 11 percent from August 2006. Cumulative pork production for the first eight months of 2007 totaled 2.3 million pounds, down 10 percent from a year ago. Total hog kill was 1,900 head in August 2007, down 5 percent from a year ago. Average live weight per head was 209 pounds in August 2007, down 7 percent from the 224-pound average a year ago.

Milk Cows and Milk Production

August Milk Production Down 48 Percent From Year Ago
Hawaii?s dairy cows produced 2.5 million pounds of milk in August 2007, down 48 percent from a year ago. Cumulative milk production for the first eight months of 2007 totaled 26.8 million pounds, down 33 percent from the same period in 2006.

August?s Cow Herd Down 36 Percent From Year Ago
Hawaii?s cow herd, both dry and milking, numbered 2,700 head in August 2007, unchanged from July 2007 but down 36 percent from August 2006.

Milk Per Cow Decreases
Average milk per cow is estimated at 940 pounds for August 2007, down 18 percent from last August?s average of 1,145 pounds per cow.

Average Farm Prices

Livestock Farm Prices Generally Higher Than Year-ago Averages

Steers and heifers
The average dress weight farm price for steers and heifers is estimated at $1.00 per pound for August 2007, up half-a-cent from July and a penny per pound higher than a year ago.

Cows
The average dress weight farm price for cows is estimated at 54.0 cents per pound in August 2007, down a penny from July. The August average dress weight farm was identical to that of a year ago.

Market hogs

The average dress weight farm price for market hogs is estimated at $1.25 per pound for August 2007, unchanged from July 2007. Compared to a year ago, the dressed weight for market hogs was down 4.5 cents per pound this August.

Milk
The average farm price for milk was $29.90 per hundredweight during August 2007, unchanged from July 2007. Compared to a year ago, the August 2007 average farm price for milk was $3.50 per hundredweight higher.

Eggs
The average farm price for a dozen eggs was 98.0 cents in August 2007, down 7.0 cents from July 2007. Compared to a year ago, the average farm price for a dozen eggs was up 4.50 cents in August 2007.

Commercial red meat production for the United States totaled 4.33 billion pounds in August, up 2 percent from the 4.26 billion pounds produced in August 2006.

Beef production, at 2.45 billion pounds, was slightly above the previous year. Cattle slaughter totaled 3.13 million head, down slightly from August 2006. The average live weight was up 3 pounds from the previous year, at 1,279 pounds.

Veal production totaled 10.3 million pounds, 20 percent below August a year ago. Calf slaughter totaled 65,400 head, down 2 percent from August 2006. The average live weight was down 54 pounds from last year, at 268 pounds.

Pork production totaled 1.85 billion pounds, up 4 percent from the previous year. Hog kill totaled 9.39 million head, up 3 percent from August 2006. The average live weight was up 1 pound from the previous year, at 263 pounds.

Lamb and mutton production, at 14.7 million pounds, was up 1 percent from August 2006. Sheep slaughter totaled 227,500 head, slightly above last year. The average live weight was 129 pounds, unchanged from August a year ago.

U.S. egg production totaled 7.57 billion during August 2007, down 1 percent from last year. Production included 6.44 billion table eggs, and 1.13 billion hatching eggs, of which 1.07 billion were broiler-type and 65 million were egg-type. The total number of layers during August 2007 averaged 339 million, down 1 percent from last year. August egg production per 100 layers was 2,229 eggs, down slightly from August 2006.

All layers in the U.S. on September 1, 2007 totaled 339 million, down 1 percent from last year. The 339 million layers consisted of 281 million layers producing table or market type eggs, 55.9 million layers producing broilertype hatching eggs, and 2.73 million layers producing egg-type hatching eggs. Rate of lay per day on September 1, 2007, averaged 71.7 eggs per 100 layers, down 1 percent from September 1, 2006.

Excerpts from Livestock Slaughter (September 21, 2007) and Chickens and Eggs (September 21, 2007) releases.

Beef/cattle: Weather is still the dominant feature in the cattle/beef industry landscape. Some precipitation fell in the Southwest, Southeast, and Corn Belt, providing some relief for grain and hay crops and pastures. However, hay and other supplemental feeding continues in these areas, and beef cows continue to be sold as a result.

Pork/hogs: The fourth quarter pork export forecast was raised by 60 million pounds, following an announcement by a major U.S. packer of a sales agreement with China, to take place by December 2007. Total U.S. pork exports in 2007 are expected to be 2.97 billion pounds, about 0.8 percent lower than in 2006. U.S. pork exports next year are expected to be almost 3.1 billion pounds, or 3.8 percent above 2007. July 2007 exports to China and Hong Kong, combined, offset year-over-year declines in shipments to major U.S. foreign pork markets. Second-half production is expected to be about 11.1 billion pounds, about 3.4 percent above a year earlier, with live equivalent prices of 51-52 percent lean hogs expected to average between $50 and $51 per cwt in the third quarter, and $45 and $47 per hundredweight (cwt) in the fourth quarter. Commercial pork production next year is expected to be about 22.1 billion pounds, about 100 million pounds larger than forecast last month. The increased production forecast largely reflects revised expectations for U.S. swine imports from Canada, both in the second half of 2007 and in 2008.

Dairy: Domestic demand for dairy products, especially cheese, combined with global demand and tight world supplies, will keep milk and dairy product prices high this year and next. The upturn in milk production will moderate 2008 prices somewhat compared with 2007.

Poultry: Broiler meat production continues to slowly expand. The slow expansion and strengthening exports have allowed prices for most broiler products to remain considerably higher than in the previous year. The generally higher prices are expected to continue through the second half of 2007 and into 2008. Although turkey production and stocks of whole birds have been above a year earlier, prices for whole turkeys are expected to remain higher than the previous year through the third quarter. With a small laying flock and a strong export market, egg prices are expected to range from $1.14 to $1.15 per dozen at the wholesale level in the third quarter and to continue higher than the previous year in the fourth quarter.