MALP Lawn and Garden Fair–Saturday, June 14th, 10am-3pm, Maui Mall

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FREE event Featuring:

  • Educational talks:  Ian Cole – Breadfruit Institute;  Gerry Ross – Kupa’a Farms;  James Simpliciano – Simpli-Fresh Produce, LLC,  Emil Lynch – Maui’s Best Honey, and  Melanie King – Waste Not Want Not
  • More than 20 vendors selling plants and gardening material
  • Book sale featuring gardening and plant books
  • Door prizes
  • Free soil pH testing – Bring 2c soil sample selected from various areas across property
  • Free plant problem diagnosis – Bring a plant sample – bagged

HC&S explains the Pa‘ia spraying incident

By A&B spokesperson Meredith Ching

This is my understanding of the situation you have inquired about. On October 23, HC&S conducted an aerial application of an herbicide, Clean Amine, on its Field 212, located along Hana Highway, just west of Paia town. We were attempting to eliminate a noxious weed, castor bean, from the field, as it shades out the crop and depresses sugar yields. Aerial herbicide application was required because the 16-month old cane is too dense to allow access for ground spraying, and the weed height exceeded the canopy of the cane.

The active ingredient in Clean Amine is 2,4-D, which is among the most widely used weed control chemicals in the world and is present in a number of substances labeled for residential use. For more information about 2,4-D, refer to http://www.24d.org. This product is labeled for aerial application, and applications were made in compliance with the pesticide label. The mix used on Field 212 was a very diluted formulation, consisting of about 2% of 2, 4-D by weight.

We fully appreciate that the helicopter’s presence was likely startling for the residents. By design, they fly very low when applying the agricultural substances, for the very reason of minimizing drift and applying the substances most directly on the plants. Further, with this type of application of Clean Amine, the substance is only released when directly over the targeted weeds (which are very visible above the cane).

Further, when HC&S undertakes aerial applications on its fields, we generally do so in the morning when wind speeds are lower and more predictable; gusts and variable winds typically occur later in the day. Wind characteristics are an important factor for aerial applications, and one that HC&S carefully considers prior to any application. A spotter goes along on all aerial applications, monitors and records wind speeds and directions, and watches for any visual signs of drift so that prompt action can be taken to address it.

Tractors Are Vintage, but Ready for Dirty Work

By BARRIE ALAN PETERSON
FROM Pebble Beach, Calif., to Greenwich, Conn., and at dozens of picturesque settings in between, shows for vintage vehicles offer enthusiasts the opportunity to rub elbows with historic machinery in country-club surroundings.

Not every gathering needs to be a concours d’élégance where white-gloved judges probe the undersides of pristine Duesenbergs in search of a historically incorrect hose clamp, however. A decidedly more populist show was the 21st Red Power Roundup, which attracted an estimated 25,000 people last June to the LaPorte County Fairgrounds in northwest Indiana to see some 2,000 tractors and trucks made by International Harvester.

One of more than 1,400 antique tractor events across North America in 2010 listed by Farm Collector magazine, it is considered by many in the hobby to be the World Series of farm tractor meets, a heartland counterpoint to blazer-and-ascot antique car events and casual suburban cruise nights.

To a casual spectator, the rows of gleaming red International tractors represent the steady progress of industry in modernizing crop production, but to the shrinking number of Americans rooted in farming, they represent a heroic era. From the early 20th century, tractors pulled plows and cultivating equipment, powered grain combines and hay balers, eventually hauling crops to the barn or to an elevator in town. They enabled American farmers to feed the world.

Business Briefs – Hawaii Business – Star Bulletin

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Maui Pine auction has good prices

KAHULUI » Maui Land & Pineapple Co. auctioned off a $23 million fresh fruit processing line for just $125,000.

Company President Ryan Churchill didn’t expect many bidders for the equipment because it is so specialized.

The auction held Tuesday at the Maui Beach Hotel drew more than 300 bargain hunters, with many more bidders online.

Maui Pine held the auction to sell off warehouses full of equipment after closing Maui’s last pineapple plantation late last year.

The company already has sold or leased some of its land and equipment to Haliimaile Pineapple Co. Haliimaile is trying to revive pineapple on a smaller scale.

Business Briefs – Hawaii Business – Starbulletin.com

Last pieces of Maui Pine sold at auction – The Maui News

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Going, going — now it’s gone

KAHULUI – The $23 million fresh fruit processing line that three years ago was supposed to represent the new future of Maui Pineapple Co. was auctioned Tuesday for $125,000.

"It’s so specialized," said Maui Land & Pineapple Co. President Ryan Churchill, noting that there weren’t likely to be a lot of buyers for the equipment.

More than 300 bargain hunters and looky-loos crowded the Elleaire Ballroom at the Maui Beach Hotel for an all-day extravaganza of hope that kept three auctioneers chattering in relays, as many more bidders were online, following the action from around the world.

ML&P closed down its Maui Pine subsidiary at the end of last year, selling or leasing some of its land and equipment to Haliimaile Pineapple Co. But the unwanted leftovers went on the block Monday, ranging from wrecked golf carts to never-used office equipment to a generating station that could power a city of 50,000.

It was a day when the complete newbie could go head to head with the experienced auction-goer and come away a winner.

Like Becky Woods, chief executive officer of Maui Economic Concerns of the Community, which runs Ka Hale A Ke Ola and other island homeless shelters. She noticed pictures of golf carts on the front page of The Maui News on Tuesday morning and decided to check it out.

Great American Group(R)* Contracted to Manage Auction of Excess Assets of Maui Pineapple Company

WOODLAND HILLS, CA–(Marketwire – March 15, 2010) – Great American Group, Inc. (OTCBB: GAMR), a leading provider of asset disposition, valuation and appraisal services, announced they have been contracted to auction excess assets no longer required for the ongoing needs of Maui Pineapple Company.

The auction will take place on Tuesday, March 23rd, starting at 10:00 a.m. HT (Hawaii Time). Live simultaneous bidding will occur onsite and online. The sale will offer assets and equipment from three separate facilities and will include Processing & Cannery Equipment, Construction/Agriculture/Harvesting Machinery, Power Plant Generators, Trucks & Trailers, Facility Equipment, Machine Shop, Distribution and Warehouse Equipment, and much more! For detailed descriptions of all items available visit www.greatamerican.com or call 1-800-45GREAT.

Pineapple Plant Auction

Public Auction: Pineapple Plant of excess equipment no longer needed for current operations

Auction Date: Tuesday, March 23 at 10am – at Maui Beach Hotel in Kahului Maui

Previews/inspection on Monday, March 22, 9am – 4pm (at 3 locations or by appointment)

– 120 Kane Street, Kahului, 870 Haliimaile Rd. Makawao, 4900 L. Honoapiilani Hwy, Honolua Baseyard

Items for auction: Pineapple Processing & Cannery, Agriculture Equipment, Power Plant Generators, Trucks & Trailers, Facility Equipment, Machine Shop, Lab & R&D Equipment, Distribution Warehouse.

Auction information at www.greatamerican.com or 818-884-3747 ext. 1330