Thanksgiving Holiday Guide

Craft Fairs & Markets

Hoala Winter Craft Sale A variety of craft, food and specialty booths. Hoala School, 1067 A California Ave.: Sat., 12/4, (9am–3pm) 621-1898

Mamo Arts Market The arts market features Native Hawaiian artisans, keiki activities and live music. Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice St.: Sat., 12/4, (9am–5pm) Free. 847-3511

36th Annual Mayor’s Craft Sale The yearly event features unique handmade items created by city senior clubs, along with other exciting arts, crafts and entertainment. Neal Blaisdell Center, 777 Ward Ave.: Sat., 12/4, (9am–2pm) Free. 768-3045

“It’s Really Nice” Fine Arts & Crafts Show A fine arts and crafts show through the holidays. [www.louispohlgallery.com]. Louis Pohl Gallery, 1111 Nuuanu Ave.: Runs through Tue., 12/28, 521-1812

7th Annual Christmas in Honolulu An evening craft fair with local art, clothing, soup mixes, jewelry, ceramics, purses and more. Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii, 2454 South Beretania St.: Tue., 11/30, (5–8:30pm) Free. 734-3693

12 Ways of Christmas A dozen craft artisans showcase one-of-a-kind items. Cafe Laufer, 3565 Waialae Ave., Mon., 11/29, (5–9pm) 753-3611

Editorial – A time for … turkey trivia : Viewpoints – Tampa Bay Newspapers

Just in case you wanted to know, here’s some Thanksgiving trivia for you to chew on as you enjoy the holiday with family and friends.

• The National Turkey Federation says that 87 percent of Americans eat turkey at Thanksgiving whether it’s coffee rubbed turkey from Hawaii, barbecued turkey, cajun fried turkey or – say it isn’t so – in a television frozen dinner.

USDA Chickens and Eggs Report for October

Bloomberg

Following is the text of the U.S. chicken and eggs report, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture:

October Egg Production Down Slightly

United States egg production totaled 7.68 billion during October 2010, down slightly from last year. Production included 6.60 billion table eggs, and 1.08 billion hatching eggs, of which 1.01 billion were broiler-type and 71 million were egg-type. The total number of layers during October 2010 averaged 336 million, up slightly from last year. October egg production per 100 layers was 2,285 eggs, down slightly from October 2009.

All layers in the United States on November 1, 2010 totaled 336 million, down slightly from last year. The 336 million layers consisted of 279 million layers producing table or market type eggs, 54.2 million layers producing broiler-type hatching eggs, and 2.96 million layers producing egg-type hatching eggs. Rate of lay per day on November 1, 2010, averaged 73.8 eggs per 100 layers, down 1 percent from November 1, 2009.

Egg-Type Chicks Hatched Up 10 Percent

Egg-type chicks hatched during October 2010 totaled 41.3 million, up 10 percent from October 2009. Eggs in incubators totaled 38.6 million on November 1, 2010, up 12 percent from a year ago.

Food Bank buys 900 turkeys to ease holiday hunger

KAPA‘A — Kelvin Moniz watched as the Safeway forklift driver negotiated more than six pallets of turkeys into the waiting Kaua‘i Independent Food Bank truck, Monday.

“We bought about 900 turkeys to help feed the hungry for Thanksgiving,” said Moniz, KIFB operations manager. “This is more than last year when we could only afford to buy about 500 turkeys.”

Distribution of the holiday turkeys will take place at numerous locations island-wide on Thursday, although Moniz said some may go out a little later.

Despite the amount which is almost double from that purchased last year, Moniz said they are still in need of more birds.

“Right now, we’re at least 16 turkeys short,” he said. “But by the end of the week, we anticipate a shortage of about 50 turkeys.”

The purchase of turkeys from Safeway coincides with the arrival of Thanksgiving and the holidays and highlights the need for support for the KIFB Holiday Food and Fund Drive which runs through Dec. 15.

“Sunday we got a contribution from the Hawai‘i Children’s Theater for about 380 pounds of food,” Moniz said. “That came from the ‘Peter Pan’ production going on. The HCT did a drive where half was contributed to the Salvation Army and half to the KIFB. All told, they collected more than 700 pounds of food — in one weekend!”

DLNR seeks comments on hunting rules

The state Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) is continuing to hold statewide public hearings this week and next for Hawaii Administrative Rule (HAR) amendments to update Chapters 13-122 and 123, hunting rules for game birds and game mammals.

Public information meetings will start at 6 p.m., followed by public hearings at 7 p.m. not to exceed two hours.

The Big Island sessions will be Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 16-17.

Marilyn Monroe’s Stuffing Recipe Stars in a Remake

THE image of a bombshell cooking her way to nirvana may seem old-hat now, thanks to Nigella, Giada, Padma and the like. But back in the 1950s, a Hollywood starlet was not expected to squander her talents (or risk her manicure) chopping onions.

A new book, however, includes a recipe in Marilyn Monroe’s handwriting that suggests that she not only cooked, but cooked confidently and with flair.

“Fragments” (Farrar, Straus & Giroux; $30) collects assorted letters, poems and back-of-the-envelope scribblings that span the time from Monroe’s first marriage in 1943 to her death in 1962. Most of the material, however, dates from the late ’50s, when she was at the height of her fame, moved to New York, married Arthur Miller and connected with Lee Strasberg and his Actors Studio. Her poignant attempts to assert her intellectual side are what have made news about this collection, but the recipe on Page 180 was a bigger revelation to us.

Scrawled on stationery with a letterhead from a title insurance company, the recipe describes in some detail how to prepare a stuffing for chicken or turkey.

DLNR Proposes Hunting Rule Amendments

In regard to hunting rules for game birds and mammals, DLNR will hold statewide public hearings, starting November 8, on amendments to update hunting rules for game birds and game mammals.

A public information meeting will be held at the Mitchell Pauole Center on Monday, Nov. 8 at 6 p.m., followed by public hearing at 7 p.m.

The proposed changes relate mainly to re-establishing the stamp, tag and application hunting fees in place before 2008, providing for permits for disabled hunters, and updating descriptions and maps of public hunting areas. This includes removal of some Natural Area Reserves from public hunting, and adding public hunting areas such as the Pu`u Mali Mitigation Area on Hawaii Island and agricultural lands on Kauai.

The full text of the proposed rules with amendments can be found at http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/rules or at DOFAW district and administrative offices.

DLNR Proposes Hunting Rule Amendments | Molokai Dispatch

Four Fantastic Thanksgiving Beach Vacation Ideas | The Brooklyn Nomad

Oahu is an ultimate Thanksgiving vacation beach destination, and here you can celebrate “traditional” Thanksgiving with an island flare. Several organizations in Hawaii raise funds by selling to-go turkey dinners cooked in an Imu – the way succulent kalua pig is prepared for luaus – in an underground “oven” covered with banana leaves. Look in the local Hawaii newspapers every year for Imu Thanksgiving turkey fundraisers, and take your Imu turkey dinner to the beach for a Thanksgiving Day picnic. Before succumbing to your turkey feast you can join the 36th annual Turkey Trot 10 Mile Run held on Thanksgiving morning. Every year there is a holiday parade in Waikiki the Friday evening following Thanksgiving. The parade features high school and military bands from across the United States, as well as brightly colored floats decorated in the Hawaiian style with flowers and leis.

You can still revere the pilgrims, autumn leaves, and frost on the pumpkin – but really enjoy Thanksgiving sunbathing on a beach!

Four Fantastic Thanksgiving Beach Vacation Ideas | The Brooklyn Nomad

Kailua High offers imu space

The Kailua High School athletic program will tend to a Thanksgiving imu and is offering space inside for trays of food.

Food goes into the underground oven on Nov. 24, emerging the next morning steamed full of luau flavor.

Cost is $15 per large foil tray. Food — such as whole turkeys, roasts or pork butt (meat chunks should have three deep cuts in them), sweet potatoes, taro or luau leaves — must be thawed, seasoned and well wrapped in foil. Drop in pan and wrap again in foil. Weight limit per tray is 25 pounds.

Reservations due by Nov. 17. Make checks payable to Kailua High School and send to the school, 451 Ulumanu Drive, Kailua 96734. Write “Attention IMU” in lower left corner of the envelope. Include your name, telephone number and a self-addressed, stamped envelope so a confirmation ticket can be sent to you. To be included in an e-mail list for future imu, provide e-mail address as well.

Call 266-7910 or 728-7389.

Morsels – Hawaii Features – Staradvertiser.com