HAWAII MONTHLY LIVESTOCK REVIEW

Here is the PDF file for the *Hawaii Monthly Livestock Review *Report.

lvstk040507.pdf

Please visit the website for more information: http://www.nass.usda.gov/hi/

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Contact Information:
Mark E. Hudson, Director
USDA NASS Hawaii Field Office
1421 South King Street
Honolulu, HI 96814-2512

Office: (808) 973-9588 / (800) 804-9514
Fax: (808) 973-2909
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“HAWAII MONTHLY LIVESTOCK REVIEW” reports are available on our website http://www.nass.usda.gov/hi/ and also PRINTED monthly. Subscriptions for PRINTED copies are free to those persons who report agricultural data to NASS (upon request) and available for $4 per year to all others.

February Egg Production Down 19 Percent From A Year Ago

Hawaii egg production totaled 6.4 million (17,778 cases) in February 2007, down 19 percent from February 2006. The average number of layers on hand during February 2007 was estimated at 395,000, down 2 percent from January and down 17 percent from February 2006.

The average rate of lay during February 2007 was 1,620 per 100 layers (57.9 percent rate of lay), down 3 percent from February 2006.

February Cattle Marketings Down 32 Percent From 2006

Total cattle marketings for February 2007 is estimated at 2,300 head, down 32 percent from February 2006. Cumulative cattle marketings for the first two months of 2007 totaled 8,100 head, down 15 percent from a year ago.

February exports down 42 percent from year ago

Exports of steers and heifers totaled 1,500 head in February 2007, down 42 percent from a year ago. During the first two months of 2007, 6,400 head have been exported, down 19 percent from the same period a year ago. A breakdown of February 2007 exports shows that both categories of cattle experienced a decline. At 700 head, February 2007 exports of steers were down 42 percent from February 2006. Exports of heifers also totaled 700 head in February 2007, down 50 percent from last February. Exports of other classes of cattle were not included.

Average live weight up 4 percent

The average live weight of steers and heifers exported from Hawaii in February 2007 was 446 pounds, up 16 percent or 61 pounds from a year ago. Commercial Beef Production Up 7 Percent Hawaii commercial beef production (local slaughter) during February 2007 totaled 478,000 pounds, up 7 percent from February 2006. Cumulative beef production (local slaughter) for the first two months of 2007 totaled 1.0 million pounds, up 13 percent from a year ago. Commercial kill totaled 800 head in February, unchanged from the February 2006?s total of 800 head. Average live weight per head increased to 1,093 pounds in February 2007, 3 percent heavier than in February 2006.

Commercial Beef Production

Up 7 Percent Hawaii commercial beef production (local slaughter) during February 2007 totaled 478,000 pounds, up 7 percent from February 2006. Cumulative beef production (local slaughter) for the first two months of 2007 totaled 1.0 million pounds, up 13 percent from a year ago. Commercial kill totaled 800 head in February, unchanged from the February 2006?s total of 800 head. Average live weight per head increased to 1,093 pounds in February 2007, 3 percent heavier than in February 2006.

Commercial Pork Production Down 8 Percent

Hawaii commercial pork production during February 2007 totaled 254,000 pounds, down 8 percent from February 2006. Cumulative pork production during the first two months of 2007 totaled 535,000 pounds, down 8 percent from a year ago. Total hog kill was 1,500 head in February 2007, down 12 percent from a year ago. Average live weight per head was 219 pounds in February 2007, down 2 percent from the 224-pound average a year ago.

Hawaii County

Hilo and Puna districts saw an increase in new grass growth as temperatures slowly began to rise and days lengthen. Ranchers reported adequate water supplies in streams as well as in stock ponds. Cattle and calves were in good condition with no unusual losses being reported.

Ka`u district pastures were in fair to good condition as soil moisture was adequate. Lower elevation pastures were fairly green, but growth was slow. Pahala pastures were beginning to show stress from low moisture. Further south, rainfall was more plentiful and grass growth was evident in the Kahuku and South Point areas.

North and South Kona districts received good showers early in the month, but new grass growth could not be sustained due to the rapid decrease in soil moisture due to dry weather. Pastures in the upper slopes experienced cloudy skies, cool afternoons, and showers which helped to spur re-growth. Coastal and low elevation pastures were very dry with only dry feed available for grazing. Prospects for new grass growth were poor. Stock water supplies were low.

North and South Kohala districts experienced heavy showers in isolated areas at the start of the month. The Puukapu and Mana areas had new grass growth and available feed supplies were good. Cooler temperatures had a slight slowing effect on grass growth. Increased soil moisture in thenormally dry Lalamilo pastures boosted new grass growth. Leeward Kohala mountain pastures, that were brown from a lack of rain, were observed with new grass growth. Adequate soil moisture in the Kapaau and Hawi pastures helped to produce adequate feed supplies. South Kohala coastal areas had only dry standing feed and were in poor condition. Pastures below Waikii received good showers and had fair new grass growth. Upper Waikii and Kilohana pastures remained very dry. A brush fire blackened about 50 acres of dry rangeland in the Kilohana area.

Hamakua district pastures were in generally good condition. Warmer temperatures and increasingly longer days have spurred grass growth. Stock water supplies are mostly adequate as streams were flowing at near normal levels.

Maui County

Maui Island:

Pastures on the east side of Maui received beneficial showers, but cool temperatures prevented optimal growth. Some pastures have been re-seeded to increase the quality of forage. Overall, these pastures were in fair to good condition. Lower pastures in Ulupalakua were drying out and mice have become a concern. Upper elevation pastures were in fair condition, but rainfall is needed. Pastures in Keokea were still able to provide feed, although there is a greater percentage of dry forage. Lower elevation pastures in Kulawere drying out. There was still a good amount of dry forage available, but green forage was of inferior quality. Haiku pastures were in fair condition. Previously irrigated pastures in the central area of the Maui were drying out and did not appear to be receiving irrigation. Pastures in Kahakuloa were able to maintain steady re-growth due to occasional showers and decreased grazing pressure.

Honolulu County

Except for some interior sections, rainfall was below normal on Oahu. Pastures were in fair condition with some supplemental feeding being supplied.

Kauai County

Windward areas record near or above normal rainfall while leeward sections were below normal. Pastures were in fair to good conditions with lots of weeds in some areas. Livestock conditions were generally good.

1/ Rainfall stations were selected from the National Weather Service?s Hydronet system of automated rain gages. Featured stations may vary each month. All rainfall data has not been quality controlled, and therefore is not certified by the National Weather Service. A complete listing of Hydronet stations, rainfall gage location maps, and other rainfall data may be found at the National Weather Service?s hydrology homepage: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/hnl/pages/hydrology.php

February Milk Production Down 23 Percent From Year Ago

Hawaii?s dairy cows produced 3.7 million pounds of milk in February 2007, down 23 percent from a year ago. Cumulative milk production for the first two months of 2007 totaled 8.1 million pounds, down 20 percent from the same period in 2006.

February?s Cow Herd

Down 16 Percent From Year Ago Hawaii?s cow herd, both dry and milking, numbered 3,700 head in February 2007, down 3 percent from January 2007 and down 16 percent from February 2006. Average milk per cow is estimated at 1,000 pounds for February 2007, down 8 percent from last February?s average of 1,090 pounds per cow.

Livestock Prices Higher Than Year-ago

Steers and heifers

The average dress weight farm price for steers and heifers is estimated at 99.0 cents per pound for February 2007, unchanged from January. Compared to a year ago, the February 2007 average dress weight farm price was 2 cents higher.

Cows

The average dress weight farm price for cows is estimated at 54.0 cents per pound in February 2007, unchanged from January. Compared to a year ago, the average dress weight farm price for cows was 2 cents per pound higher in February 2007.

Market hogs

The average dress weight farm price for market hogs is estimated at $1.30 per pound for February 2007, unchanged from January. Compared to a year ago, the dressed weight for market hogs was up 15 cents per pound this February.

Milk

The average farm price for milk was $26.90 per hundredweight during February 2007, up 10 cents per hundredweight from January. February 2007?s farm price for milk was 3 percent higher than a year ago.

Eggs

The average farm price for a dozen eggs was $1.05 in February 2007, unchanged from January. Compared to a year ago, the farm price for a dozen eggs was 7 percent higher in February 2007.

Commercial red meat production for the United States totaled 3.62 billion pounds in February, up 4 percent from the 3.49 billion pounds produced in February 2006.

Beef production, at 1.95 billion pounds, was 7 percent above the previous year. Cattle slaughter totaled 2.56 million head, up 9 percent from February 2006. The average live weight was down 10 pounds from the previous year, at 1,274 pounds.

Veal production totaled 12.2 million pounds, 7 percent above February a year ago. Calf slaughter totaled 66,900 head, up 27 percent from February 2006. The average live weight was down 50 pounds from last year, at 307 pounds.

Pork production totaled 1.64 billion pounds, down slightly from the previous year. Hog kill totaled 8.12 million head, down slightly February 2006. The average live weight was down 2 pounds from the previous year, at 269 pounds.

Lamb and mutton production, at 14.4 million pounds, was down 2 percent from February 2006. Sheepslaughter totaled 204,400 head, 1 percent above last year. The average live weight was 140 pounds, down 4 pounds from February a year ago.

U.S. egg production totaled 6.91 billion during February 2007, down 1 percent from last year. Production included 5.92 billion table eggs, and 998 million hatching eggs, of which 937 million were broilertype and 61 million were egg-type. The total number of layers during February 2007 averaged 347 million, down 1 percent from last year. February egg production per 100 layers was 1,992 eggs, down slightly from February 2006.

All layers in the U.S. on March 1, 2007 totaled 347 million, down 1 percent from last year. The 347 million layers consisted of 288 million layers producing table or market type eggs, 56.5 million layers producing broilertype hatching eggs, and 2.82 million layers producing egg-type hatching eggs. Rate of lay per day on March 1, 2007, averaged 71.6 eggs per 100 layers, unchanged from March 1, 2006.

Excerpts from Livestock Slaughter (March 23, 2007) and Chickens and Eggs (March 23, 2007) releases.

Cattle/Beef: Low forage reserves continue to result in heavy cow and calf slaughter. Weekly year-to-date total calf slaughter is almost 28 percent above last year?s cumulative year-to-date total for the same period, while production is up only 6 percent. Farm-to-retail price spreads are increasing seasonally, along with increasing fed cattle and retail prices, and byproduct values are nearing record levels. Forecast beef exports for 2007, while up from the 2006 total, were reduced somewhat due to slow growth in shipments to major Asian markets.

Hogs/Pork: The USDA forecast for first-quarter 2007 commercial pork production was lowered 50 million pounds, to 5.325 billion pounds, due to slightly lower than expected slaughter and lower average dressed weights. First-quarter prices of live-equivalent 51-52 percent lean hogs are expected to range between $46 and $47 per hundredweight (cwt), more than 9 percent above first quarter a year ago. Hog prices will likely belower in the second half of this year as pork production accelerates seasonally and broiler production expands. U.S. packers and hog finishers are expected to import 9.35 million head of hogs from Canada this year, an increase of almost 7 percent over last year.

Dairy: Rapidly rising feed prices have limited production increases. The smaller production expansion in light of strong demand should boost prices for milk and dairy products in 2007. Exports of dry products continue to sharply raise prices in that segment of the market.

Poultry: With a decline in broiler meat production in January 2007, the estimate for first-quarter 2007 meat production was lowered by 75 million pounds to 8.75 billion pounds and the estimate for the second quarter was lowered by 50 million pounds, bringing the 2007 estimate to 35.9 billion pounds. Prices for almost all broiler products have strengthened considerably and are much higher than in the first 2 months of 2006. Turkey meat production in first-quarter 2007 isestimated at 1.41 billion pounds, up 4 percent from a year earlier. Even with the higher production and increased stock levels, prices for many turkey products were higher than at the start of 2006.

Poultry Trade: U.S. broiler exports finished strong in 2006, while turkey exports fell short. Broiler shipments were down, while turkey shipments were up, for January 2007. Broiler exports in January totaled 396 million pounds, a decline of 7 percent, while turkey exports totaled 42 million pounds, an increase of 13.3 percent from a year ago.

Sheep/Lamb: Typically, lamb demand exhibits some seasonality and is highest during the Passover/Easter holidays. As a result, production increases are expected in the weeks leading up to the holiday season. However, production for the first quarter 2007 is forecast 2 percent lower than for the same period last year. Choice Slaughter lamb prices at San Angelo have not seen significant increases despite lower production. Imports of lamb and mutton are expected to continue to increase, offsetting U.S. production declines.

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